Posts written by jbranson

4k Ultra High Definition TV, is t just another 3D fad?

4k television is the new big thing in display tech, and it’s coming to a big screen living room TV near you.

Today’s 1920 x 1080 resolution Full HD TVs present us with an image of around 2 megapixels, but this new generation of screens delivers an 8 megapixel image from hi-res cameras.

With new Ultra HD 4K TVs arriving this year from the big TV brands, it will soon become a format for both broadcast TV and Blu-ray.

Technically speaking, 4K denotes a very specific display resolution of 4096 x 2160. This is the resolution of all 4K recordings, though many people use 4K to refer to any display resolution that has roughly 4000 horizontal pixels.

Ultra HD TVs have a resolution slightly lower than that – 3840 x 2160. That’s exactly four times higher than the full HD resolution of 1920 x 1080.

Many current movie cameras already film above 4K resolutions, for example the RED Epic which can film at a 5K resolution of 5120 x 2700 and the Sony F65 which films at 8192 x 4320 (8K).

How big is an Ultra HD TV?

So far it’s been monster Ultra HD TVs all the way, with Sony’s 84-inch 84X9005 and LG’s 84-inch 84LM960V leading the way alongside the now-a-bit-old Toshiba 55ZL2, a 55-inch TV whose real claim is glasses-free 3D TV (though there’s more where that came from, this time from Philips).

However, this summer Sony is launching 55-inch and 65-inch models in the form of the Sony KD-55X9000A and the Sony KD-65X9000A. Previous 84-inch models cost upwards of £20,000 ($30,000) but the 55-inch Sony will start at $5,000 in the US and £4,000 in the UK.

More models are coming from the likes of Samsung, LG and Panasonic and will likely launch at IFA at the end of August.

Do you need Ultra HD?

High definition comes in two flavours: 720p (HD ready) and 1080p (Full HD), both of which offer more picture information than the standard definition formats. The more pixels that make up an image, the more detail you see – and the smoother the appearance of curved and diagonal lines. Ultra HD just takes that on to the next level.

A high pixel count also enables images to go larger before they break up, which suits the trend to bigger TVs. Ultra HD is already making big inroads into the world of digital cinema; almost all major Hollywood movies and TV shows are filmed in 4K – or even 5K.

Of course, perceived picture resolution is as much about viewing distance as resolution. What’s the real difference between 720p and 1080p? The answer is about two metres. Increase the pixel density and you can sit closer without the pixel grid becoming obvious; a 2160p image – or Ultra HD – enables you to sit 1.6m from the screen.

Some engineers dispute that you can see a difference between 2K and 4K on any screen less than 100-inches; go larger and the subtle nuances that make up a 4K picture certainly become easier to appreciate.

Can I buy an Ultra HD home cinema projector?

Yes. The first genuine Ultra HD consumer product to hit the streets was the Sony VPL-VW1000ES in 2012, a home cinema projector that borrows technologies originally developed for the brand’s commercial digital cinema projectors. Indeed, the VPL-VW1000ES conforms to the Digital Cinema Initiative (DCI) specification, which uses a slightly different resolution (4096 x 2160 pixels) than Ultra HD TVs.

Not to be confused with JVC’s DLA-X95R, DLA-X75R and DLA-X55R ‘4K branded’ projectors, which actually deliver a Full HD picture but use pixel-shifting panel technology (called e-shift2) to produce a more textured and detailed image, the Sony VPL-VW1000ES has a native UHD 8.8 million pixel SXRD panel, to deliver true Ultra HD resolution.

The Sony VPL-VW1000ES can accept Ultra HD content over HDMI and display it natively, as well as up-convert any incoming source.

What is super Hi-vision?

There’s another spanner in the works in the shape of Super Hi-Vision, an 8K format created by Japan’s national broadcaster NHK. It was trialled extensively at the London 2012 Olympics by the BBC, but doesn’t appear to have much chance of becoming a bona fide format just yet. It’s certainly one to watch; at double the frame rate of HD (at 120fps) and with a 7680 x 4320 pixel resolution (that’s around 32 megapixels), Super Hi-Vision demos have featured stunning 22.2 surround sound, too, thanks to twin subwoofers each the size of a small car.

Technically Super Hi-Vision also comes under the umbrella of the Ultra HD specification, which could store-up problems for future; how will anyone be able to explain the difference? Super-Ultra HD, anyone? Mega HD?

Will Ultra HD ever be broadcast on TV?

Technically it already is; Eutelsat Communications launched the first Ultra HD demo channel in Europe in January 2013, on its EUTELSAT 10A satellite. In the UK, the BBC has plans to film some documentaries with 4K equipment in 2013, though it’s actually trialled Super Hi-Vision – or 8K – broadcasting as recently as the London Olympics.

Just as Planet Earth was one of the first programmes to be shown in HD, the BBC’s Natural History Unit have been handed the task of filming Survival in Ultra HD.

South Korea currently leads the way in Ultra HD broadcasting; its KBS Kwanak Transmitter uses DVB-T2 architecture (the tech behind Freeview HD in the UK) to send an Ultra HD signal compressed using HEVC encoding.

A six-month trial of the same tech in the US is scheduled for 2013 that will attempt the broadcast of Ultra HD TV signals in the Baltimore area, while at Mobile World Congress 2013 a Spanish telecoms company, Abertis, conducted an experiment to broadcast Ultra HD TV pictures using DVB-T2 and an 84-inch Ultra HD TV.

Meanwhile, the 2014 World Cup Final from Brazil will be shown in Ultra HD to satellite viewers in Japan, though that country may attempt Super Hi-Vision broadcasts as early as 2016 or 2018.

Will Blu-ray support Ultra HD discs?

Probably, yes, thanks to that new compression codec called HEVC, though the Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA) has yet to ratify anything.

The good news is that there is Ultra HD content already available in the vaults of the Hollywood majors. Increasingly movies are mastered at 4K resolution, both for commercial distribution and restoration projects. Hollywood has also begun shooting movies in Ultra HD and beyond.

Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey was shot on RED Epic digital cameras that are capable of 5K resolution, while Sony’s 4K-capable F65 camera is commonly used in film and TV, too. Many US TV dramas are already filmed with one of these cameras, including Made In Jersey, Justified, Save Me and Masters of Sex, according to The Hollywood Reporter, as well as ER, Criminal Minds and Justified.

Quite whether studio bosses actually want this level of picture quality in the hands of consumers remains to be seen. Naturally Ultra HD Blu-ray discs would also require a new generation of BD hardware; so-called 4K-ready Blu-ray players including the new Sony S5100 and Samsung BD-F7500 machines – due for launch in spring 2013 – are only able to upscale regular Blu-ray into Ultra HD-quality, and almost certainly won’t play the yet-to-be-invented new Ultra HD discs.

How can I get Ultra HD films onto my Ultra HD TV?

In the absence of shiny discs, the first generation of Ultra HD TV owners will have to rely on ‘content delivery systems’. Sony will supply with its new 4K TVs a server containing seven native 4K movies – titles TBC – though heavily compressed downloads from Sony (in summer 2013) and others looks to be the next step.

Destined to be the first 4K player to go on sale, the Redray 4K Cinema Player will cost US$1,450 when it launches in spring 2013. Equipped with a 1TB hard disk, this machine can play 4K content stored on an SD card or USB slot, too – such is the file compression on offer – though it’s networked and can stream 4K video from a central server, Lovefilm Instant/Netflix-style.

These two innovations aside, the Ultra HD YB market will be mostly about upscaling for some time to come, and the savvy buyer will carefully consider how good a particular Ultra HD TV is at taking a standard or high definition signal and blowing it up onto a big screen. From the demos we’ve seen of Blu-ray being upscaled to Ultra HD, the big brands seem to have put a lot of work into this; they all look amazing.

When will Ultra HD become standard?

The floors of CES 2013 were packed with them, but it could be a difficult birth. With arguments and a lack of industry standards on displays, broadcast and playback of Ultra HD material, the introduction of these cutting-edge TVs will prove complex in the extreme.

Introducing an Ultra HD TV isn’t like adding LED backlighting to an LCD screen. It’s about orchestrating a seismic shift in the broadcast and entertainment infrastructure, not to mention rewriting the consumer electronics handbook.

Currently the only devices to offer Ultra HD play-out are ultra high resolution PC graphics cards, which typically use a quartet of SDI or HDMI outputs to deliver 8MP of video.

There are also myriad disagreements about what exactly Ultra HD displays and equipment should offer in terms of the exact colour standards, frame rate, compression codec and broadcast technology.

In fact, Ultra HD doesn’t yet exist – it’s a logo-free collection of guidelines that manufacturers should adhere to. Once they’re signed, sealed and agreed and a delivery mechanism – 4K Blu-ray, or 4K downloading – along with a tweaked version of HDMI, is all in place, it’s possible that existing Ultra HD TVs won’t be up to the task. Who’d be an early adopter?

What about Ultra HD for photographers?

The picture’s brighter for digital photographers. The PlayStation3 now displays digital still images at 4K resolution over HDMI (how about a PS4K, anyone?), while Panasonic has been busy prepping prototype displays aimed at image-makers. As well as its 4K resolution 20-inch TV, Panasonic recently presented an identically-sized 4K tablet aimed at designers, photographers and architects.

So despite the excitement in the world of TV, a lack of agreement throughout the industry means that the first enthusiasts to benefit from Ultra HD technology could be photographers, and not cinema enthusiasts.

However, manufacturers have already shown that they think the sweet-spot for Ultra HD TV sits between 55 and 65 inches; isn’t that the size you’d like your next TV to be? With a couple of games consoles, some Blu-ray players capable of spitting out Ultra HD resolution images, and a BBC UHD trial channel, we’re convinced that within a few years most TV buyers won’t be able to resist the temptation of making sure their purchase is at least future-proofed to Ultra HD.

And today’s future-proofed TV is tomorrow’s cut-price commodity… though is that what they said about 3D TV?

 

Most popular Radio Stations in the UK

Media UK publishes all the audience figures for every radio station – here’s Radio 1’s audience figures for example. You’ll find audience figures published on the Media UK website, linked-to from most radio station pages: and linked from some radio station owners too. We also list a full set of charts and data.

The figures below, however, also include radio station brands: we’re treating “Heart” or “Kiss” as one station here, rather than each individual local radio service. This gives a clearer view of the popularity of station brands.

These figures are based on RAJAR ending September 2013.

The top 10 radio stations with the most listeners
Normally, when people ask for the most popular radio station, they mean the one with the most amount of listeners. This will always give national or London stations as a result, and ignore smaller, local radio stations – even though, in many areas, the most popular station is a local one.

1. BBC Radio 2 (14.9m listeners every week)
2. BBC Radio 4* (10.9m)
3. BBC Radio 1 (10.8m)
4. Capital (7.7m)
5. Heart (7.6m)
6. BBC Radio 5 live* (6.5m)
7. Classic FM (5.3m)
8. Kiss (5.0m)
9. Smooth Radio* (3.8m)
10. Magic (3.7m)

In terms of individual radio stations, we list all UK stations in order of total listener numbers, total time spent listening, and market share.

The top 10 radio owners with the most listeners
It’s also important to look at radio owners, since they have the market in commercial terms.

1. BBC national radio (32.0m listeners every week)
2. Global Radio (20.4m)
3. Bauer Media (14.3m)
4. BBC local/regional radio (9.3m)
5. Real and Smooth Ltd(6.0m)
6. UTV Radio (4.5m)
7. TIML Radio (Absolute Radio) (3.4m)
8. BBC World Service (1.5m)
9. Orion Media (1.2m)
10. Jazz FM (0.7m)
At the time of writing this, Global Radio and Real & Smooth Ltd were both owned by Global Radio. The merger is subject to competition rules. Bauer Media were in the process of buying TIML Radio, but this deal had not been approved at the time of writing.

Additionally…

The top 10 radio stations with the highest amount of listeners in their area
If you want to look at popularity based on how many people listen in their area (and thus, take on board local radio stations as well as national), then the ‘reach percent’ is the best figure to examine. This shows you people who’ve listened for at least five minutes a week, and takes no account of whether they listen any longer than that. Here’s a full list.

The top 10 radio stations with the highest listening share in their area
The share of listening in a station’s broadcast area is normally the best way of monitoring how popular a radio station is. This makes it easier to work out how popular the station’s entire broadcasting output is, in comparison to others in its area. Here’s a full list.

Note: figures here for BBC Radio 5 live also include BBC Radio 5 live Sports Extra; BBC Radio 4’s figures include BBC Radio 4 LW; and Smooth Radio also includes Smooth 70s.

How radio listener figures are worked out
All radio station listening figures
The most popular radio stations in London

The figures below, however, also include radio station brands: we’re treating “Heart” or “Kiss” as one station here, rather than each individual local radio service. This gives a clearer view of the popularity of station brands.

These figures are based on RAJAR ending June 2013.

The top 10 radio stations with the most listeners
Normally, when people ask for the most popular radio station, they mean the one with the most amount of listeners. This will always give national or London stations as a result, and ignore smaller, local radio stations – even though, in many areas, the most popular station is a local one.

1. BBC Radio 2 (15.4m listeners every week)
2. BBC Radio 1 (11.0m)
3. BBC Radio 4* (10.9m)
4. Heart (7.5m)
5. Capital (7.4m)
6. BBC Radio 5 live* (6.3m)
7. Classic FM (5.6m)
8. Kiss (4.4m)
9. Smooth Radio* (3.7m)
10. Magic (3.6m)

In terms of individual radio stations, we list all UK stations in order of total listener numbers, total time spent listening, and market share.

The top 10 radio owners with the most listeners
It’s also important to look at radio owners, since they have the market in commercial terms.

1. BBC national radio (32.6m listeners every week)
2. Global Radio (20.1m)
3. Bauer Media (14.0m)
4. BBC local/regional radio (9.5m)
5. Real and Smooth Ltd(5.7m)
6. UTV Radio (4.4m)
7. TIML Radio (Absolute Radio) (3.8m)
8. BBC World Service (1.4m)
9. Orion Media (1.2m)
10. Jazz FM (758,000)
At the time of writing this, Global Radio and Real & Smooth Ltd were both owned by Global Radio. The merger is subject to competition rules. Bauer Media were in the process of buying TIML Radio, but this deal had not been approved at the time of writing.

Additionally…

The top 10 radio stations with the highest amount of listeners in their area
If you want to look at popularity based on how many people listen in their area (and thus, take on board local radio stations as well as national), then the ‘reach percent’ is the best figure to examine. This shows you people who’ve listened for at least five minutes a week, and takes no account of whether they listen any longer than that. Here’s a full list.

The top 10 radio stations with the highest listening share in their area
The share of listening in a station’s broadcast area is normally the best way of monitoring how popular a radio station is. This makes it easier to work out how popular the station’s entire broadcasting output is, in comparison to others in its area. Here’s a full list.

Google TV – Internet powered Media

Google TV is a Smart TV platform from Google co-developed by Intel, Sony, and Logitech that was launched in October 2010[2] with official devices initially made by Sony and Logitech.[3] Google TV integrates the Android operating system and the Google Chrome Web Browser to create an interactive television overlay on top of existing Internet television and WebTV sites to add a 10-foot user interface, for a Smart TV experience.

Google TV’s first generation devices was only created and commercialized by Sony and Logitech, this first generation of devices were based all on x86 architecture processors by Intel. While the second generation of Google TV devices are all based on ARM architecture processors, at which time additional partners joined, including LG, Samsung,[4] Vizio, and Hisense. In 2013, more Google TV supported devices were announced by new partners, including Hisense, Netgear, TCL, and Asus. Some of which include 3D television (3D TV) display output capabilities.

An October 2013 report suggests that Google might soon cease using the Google TV label and require all new devices to be rebrand as Android TV.[5]

Google TV leverages many of Google’s existing products. Google TV’s operating system, a customized version of Android, provides the underlying foundation, allowing developers to create applications that extend the system’s functionality. Google’s Chrome browser provides a gateway to the Internet, allowing consumers to browse web sites and watch television, in tandem. Consumers can access HBO, CNBC, and content from other providers through the Chrome browser. Android and Apple smartphones and tablet computers may be used as remote controls for Google TV. Google TV products ship with wireless remote controls with a full QWERTY keypad. An update in November 2011, allowed access to Google Play and enabled search to find content from live TV, Netflix, YouTube, HBO GO, Amazon, and more.[6] In a future OS update, some of the Google TV devices will have casting support, the same as the Chromecast.[7]

Netflix is changing

Fans of streaming TV will notice big changes in Netflix starting Wednesday: The company has redone its interface to be smarter and faster. If you’re on a big, full-HD screen, you should find the new look pleasing.

The new look isn’t quite “radically new,” but it is a welcome change to the functional but ho-hum interface millions have seen every day for a couple years now.

The biggest change is more of a focus on images and previews from the show or movie you’re considering. So long static promotional pictures, hello actual screenshots — including from each individual episode. Quick summaries and video previews for each episode help catch you up on who’s still alive if you’re behind on “Sons of Anarchy.”

There’s also a faster and more visual search, so when you’re sure that movie had Al Pacino but you don’t remember anything else, start typing it in and look for a familiar setting in the visual preview.

Each series or movie now shows a bit more data on why it was recommended to you. Been watching a lot of Emmy winners? Here’s another one. Just finished “Weeds”? Here’s the creator’s new show. And of course if you choose to connect with Facebook, you’ll get recommendations and stats from there as well.

Lastly, the profiles include a redesigned “kids mode,” now available on consoles and set-top boxes. Set your preferences, pick a few appropriate shows, and hand over the controller or remote with confidence.

Compatible devices, which include “PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, Roku 3, newer Smart TVs and recent Blu-ray players,” will get the new look some time in the next two weeks, but if you’re lucky it will come Wednesday. The Xbox One will have its own separate look, and older devices will get the update later.